Solidago sempervirens seaside goldenrod Asteraceae SOSE; Bx, cm, pb, sn; NY, wr; Q, dp, fa, fr, j, rb, tl, vb, wl; K, do, fl, m, pl; R, bm, c, ca, cg, fk, go, gr, hs, jl, lc, mls, ok, pr, sm, t, v;

Solidago sempervirens.Janet Novak.www.ct-botanical-society.org

Solidago sempervirens. © 2000 Janet Novak.www.ct-botanical-society.org (Accessed 5/2014).

Solidago sempervirens is a perennial herb, somewhat stout and slightly succulent, smooth, 40 cm to 2 m tall, from a short root crown. 

Leaves smooth, thick, slightly fleshy, entire, the largest basal leaves often widest above middle, 10-40 cm long, 1-6 cm wide, persistent into winter, stem leaves reduced upwards. 

Flowers yellow, showy, relatively large, of two types in small heads, rays 12-17, 0.3-0.5 cm long, disk flowers 17-22, bracteate base of heads 0.3-0.7 cm long; inflorescence dense, narrow, branched along a central axis, flowers on one side of branches (secund); blooming and fruiting July-Nov. 

Solidago sempervirens. flowers.close-up.By Glen Mittelhauser. Copyright © 2017 Glen Mittelhauser.New England Wild Flower Society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org

Solidago sempervirens. flowers.close-up.By Glen Mittelhauser. Copyright © 2017 Glen Mittelhauser.New England Wild Flower Society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org (Accessed 3/2017).

Fruit dry 1-seeded, with white bristles, slightly hairy, wind dispersed into winter; seeds eaten by some birds. 

Wetland status: FACW. 

Frequency in NYC: Common. 

Solidago sempervirens.leaf.By Arthur Haines.Copyright © 2017.New England Wild Flower society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org

Solidago sempervirens.leaf.By Arthur Haines.Copyright © 2017.New England Wild Flower society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org (Accessed 3/2017).

Habitat: Open, coastal areas, dunes, often infected by rust fungus (Gargiullo, personal observation). Foliage eaten by the Chrysomelid beetle Paria thoracica (Krischik and Denno 1990).