Physalis virginiana Virginia ground-cherry Solanaceae PAVI; R, lp (in root ball of planted tree);

 

Physalis virginiana.Merel R. Black.Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium, U. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.gobotany.newenglandwild.org.IL

Physalis virginiana.Merel R. Black.Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium, U. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. wisplants.uwsp.edu. (Accessed 4/2014).

Physalis virginiana is a perennial herb to 60 cm, colonial from rhizomes, stems much branched in a forked pattern, most parts minutely hairy, hairs short, curved (use lens). 

Leaves alternate (sometimes appearing opposite), 4-10 cm long, narrowly egg or lance-shaped-shaped, minutely hairy, tip pointed, base narrowed, unequal or extending down stalk, margin sometimes with a few teeth or shallow lobes. 

Flowers yellow with dark purplish base or blotches, radially symmetrical, petals 1.2-1.8 cm long, anther stalks (filaments) broad below, narrowed above, calyx tube pale green, hairy, lobes 0.3-0.5 cm; flowers solitary in axils; blooms May-Aug. 

Fruit orange to red, fleshy, round, seeds numerous; calyx enlarging in fruit to 3-3.5 cm long, covering fruit in a thin, 5-angled, membranous, veiny “bag”, base sunken. 

Wetland status: UPL. 

Frequency in NYC: Very infrequent. 

Origin: Native. 

Habitat: Dry, open woods, fields. Seen only in root ball of a planted tree.