Rubus flagellaris northern dewberry Rosaceae RUFL; Bx, bg, pb, sf, wv; NY, hb, iw; Q, cu, dp, fa, j, wl; K, m, pl; R, ah, c, cl, cp, d, e, ev, fk, gr, js, lp, mls, sm, t;

Rubus flagellaris.Matthew L. Wagner.Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium.U. Wisconsin at Stevens Point.wisplants.uwsp.edu

Rubus flagellaris.Matthew L. Wagner.Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium.U. Wisconsin at Stevens Point.wisplants.uwsp.edu (Accessed 7/2014).

Rubus flagellaris is a low, colonial shrub, arching and creeping along ground, rooting at stem tips, not climbing, thorns small, curved, base expanded. 

Leaves palmately compound, of flowering stems on present years growth 3-parted, leaflets toothed, terminal leaflet egg-shaped, tip pointed, base blunt to slightly lobed. 

Rubus-flagellaris-stem.Native-Naturalized-Plants-of-the-Carolinas-and-Georgia.namethatplant.net

Rubus flagellaris stem.Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas and Georgia.namethatplant.net

Flowers white, ca 2 cm, 1-5, flowering stems leafy except near top, May-June. 

Fruit fleshy, black, multiple 1-seeded drupes, separating from stem with receptacle, each fruitlet with a seed, July-Sept.; fruit eaten by birds and mammals, seeds eaten by small rodents. 

Wetland status: NL. 

Frequency in NYC: Common. 

Origin: Native. 

Rubus flagellaris.commons.wikimedia.org

Rubus flagellaris.fruit.commons.wikimedia.org (Accessed 7/2014).

Habitat: Open upland areas, often on poor, gravelly or sandy soil, fill. 

Notes: Leaves sometimes infected by a bright orange rust, Gymnoconia sp. (Basidiomycotina, order Uredinales) (Agrios 1988)..