Diphasiastrum digitatum (Lycopodium d.; L. complanatum var. flabelliforme)  ground cedar; fan clubmoss Lycopodiaceae LYDI; R, gb, sv;

 

Lycopodium digitatum. David Burg. St. Lawrence, NY. 11/2017

Lycopodium digitatum winter plants. David Burg. St. Lawrence, NY. 11/2017

Diphasiastrum digitatum is a perennial evergreen clubmoss to 30 cm tall, colonial from stems running along the ground or just below the, soil surface, rooting at nodes, leafy stems erect, rather yellow-green, branches flattened, 0.2-0.3 cm wide, fan-shaped. 

Diphasiastrum digitatum branches. Bob Klips. Bobs Brain on Botany 10/2010. bobklips.com

Diphasiastrum digitatum branches. Bob Klips. Bobs Brain on Botany 10/2010. bobklips.com (Accessed 11/2017).

Leaves tiny, scale-like, flat, in 4-ranks, tips sharply pointed, bases broad and fused to branch surface, tips pointed outward. 

Diphasiastrum digitatum (Lycopodium d.) plant with spore cones. Bob Klips. Bob's Brain on Botany. bobklips.com

Diphasiastrum digitatum (Lycopodium d.) plant with spore cones. Bob Klips. Bob’s Brain on Botany. bobklips.com (Accessed 11/2017).

Spore cones yellow, 2-4 (or more) cm long, 0.5 cm wide, 1-4 or more in a candelabra arrangement above green branches. 

Wetland status: FACU. 

Frequency in NYC: very infrequent. 

Origin: Native. 

Habitat: Dry, sterile soil in undisturbed open woods or burned or cut-over areas. 

Lycopodiaceae life cycle. DoralBio5 Club Mosses. Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License. doralbio5.wikispaces.com

Lycopodiaceae life cycle. DoralBio5 Club Mosses. Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License. doralbio5.wikispaces.com (Accessed 11/2017).

Notes: Plants in the family Lycopodiaceae cannot be successfully transplanted or propagated for restoration to natural areas. Habitat protection is the only means of conserving these plants. They have a two stage life cycle and are usually dependent upon specialized symbiotic, mycorrhizal fungi during the subterranean gametophyte stage (Raven et al. 1986). Colonies of 250 m across, aged at 830 years old, were measured in Finland (Montgomery and Fairbrothers 1992). The family Lycopodiaceae arose in the early Devonian Period, 405-345 million years ago (Wagner and Smith 2007).