Ginkgo biloba Ginkgo; maidenhair tree Ginkgoaceae GIBI; Bx; NY, ct; Q; K, p; R, ap (E. Danielsen 4/2017);

  

Ginkgo biloba.wikidoc.org

Ginkgo biloba.wikidoc.org (Accessed 7/20140.

Ginkgo biloba is a tree to 24 m tall, bark gray-brown, deeply fissured and ridged, branches stout. 

Leaves alternate, fan-shaped, to 7 cm long and about as wide, notched and irregularly blunt-toothed along broadly curved top, base wedge-shaped, veins conspicuously parallel, in clusters of 3-5 on older short shoots or singly along elongate new stems, turning clear bright yellow in autumn. 

Flowers none. A Gymnosperm, producing seeds but not true flowers. Male and female reproductive structures on short shoots of different plants (dioecious). Pollen produced on green catkins of male trees. 

ginkgo-biloba-fruit-commons-wikimedia-org

Ginkgo biloba.fruit .commons.wikimedia.org

Fruit none. Ovules covered by fruit-like fleshy coat in pairs, rounded, 4 cm diameter, becoming pale tan-orange, flesh with a strong rancid odor (butyric acid), (Raven et al. 1986; Dirr 1990). Falling from tree early autumn and into winter. Seeds apparently edible if cooked. Flesh, however, is supposedly very irritating. 

Wetland status: NL. 

Frequency in New York City: Infrequent in natural areas. Common as a street or horticultural tree in parks. 

Origin: China. 

Habitat: Not known to escape except very locally, small seedling have been found in Central Park and in a Ginkgo grove in Prospect Park. Intolerant of shade. Tolerates air pollution well (Hightshoe 1988). 

Notes: Leaves are sometimes used as a medicinal.