Angelica atropurpurea purplestem angelica Apiaceae ANAT; Bx, pb (DeCandido 2001); NY, iw; R, h;

Angelica atropurpurea. By Arthur Haines. Copyright © 2017. New England Wild Flower Society. gobotany.newenglandwild.org

Angelica atropurpurea. By Arthur Haines. Copyright © 2017. New England Wild Flower Society. gobotany.newenglandwild.org (Accessed 8/2017).

Angelica atropurpurea is a perennial herb, taprooted, stout, stem solitary, hollow, ca 1.5 m tall, 3 cm diameter at base, purplish or purple-blotched. 

Angelica atropurpurea. leaf base. By Arthur Haines. Copyright © 2017. New England Wild Flower Society. gobotany.newenglandwild.org

Angelica atropurpurea. leaf base. By Arthur Haines. Copyright © 2017. New England Wild Flower Society. gobotany.newenglandwild.org (Accessed 8/2017).

Leaves alternate, pinnately compound, basal leaves ca. 20 cm long, often twice compound, 5-7 leaflets about 6 cm long, egg-shaped to lanceolate, margin toothed, small veins extend to tips of teeth, leaves progressively reduced upwards, petioles, conspicuously veined, inflated, sheathing, to 5 cm wide with prominent veins. 

Angelica atropurpurea flowers. 2012 © Peter M. Dziuk. Minnesota Wildflowers. minnesotawildflowers.info

Angelica atropurpurea flowers. 2012 © Peter M. Dziuk. Minnesota Wildflowers. minnesotawildflowers.info (Accessed 8/2017).

Flowers white to greenish, small, inflorescence ca 15 cm wide, umbrella shaped (compound umbel) with ca 30 rays June- Aug. 

Fruit dry, ca 1 cm, winged, July-Oct. 

Wetland status: OBL. 

Angelica atropurpurea, fruit. photo by Hugh Wilson. Texas A&M University. botany.csdt.tamu.edu

Angelica atropurpurea, fruit. photo by Hugh Wilson. Texas A&M University. botany.csdt.tamu.edu (Accessed 8/2017).

Frequency in NYC: Very infrequent. 

Origin: Native. 

Habitat: Open marshes, wet edges. Apiaceae of open sites are eaten by larvae of the black swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polyxenes (Papilionidae); (Tallamy 2003; Pyle 1981).