Acer nigrum (Acer saccharum ssp. nigrum) black maple Aceraceae ACNI; Bx, pb (DeCandido 2001);

Acer nigrum.Arthur Haines.New England Wild Flower Society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org

Acer nigrum.Arthur Haines.New England Wild Flower Society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org (Accessed 1/2015).

Acer nigrum   is much like A. saccharum. Distinguished by darker, more deeply furrowed bark.

Leaves darker green, duller above, often finely hairy below, sides and tip often drooping, lowest lobes often reduced or none, lobes usually with fewer, shorter, blunt teeth, central lobe tapered from base.

Flowers pale yellow-green, small, in wispy clusters, April-May, wind pollinated, (not reproductive before about 20 yrs).

Acer nigrum leaf base compare A. saccharum.©2004 Gary Fewless.uwgb.edu

Acer nigrum leaf base compare A. saccharum.©2004 Gary Fewless.University of Wisconsin Green Bay.www.uwgb.edu (Accessed 8/2016).

Fruit dry thin, flat, winged seeds (samaras) joined end-to end, ripens in Sept.-Oct., wind dispersed, seeds eaten by white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) (Ostfeld et al. 1997). Twigs, buds and seeds eaten by squirrels (Martin et al. 1951). Seeds apparently do not persist more than one year and generally need disturbed sites in which to germinate (Hughs and Fahey 1988).

Wetland status: UPL. 

Acer nigrum. (black maple) bark. 2014 © Peter M. Dziuk.MinnesotaWildflowers.info

Acer nigrum. (black maple) bark. 2014 © Peter M. Dziuk.MinnesotaWildflowers.info

Frequency in New York City: Very infrequent. 

Origin: Native. 

Habitat: Usually in more moist habitats than A. saccharum.