Acalypha rhomboidea (A. virginica var. r) 3-seeded mercury; common copperleaf Euphorbiaceae ACRH; Bx, br, cn, pb, up, vc, wv (Yost et al. 1991); NY, bl (Stalter and Tang 2002) (Stalter and Tang 2002), rr; Q, cu, f; K, p; R, bm, c, js;

    

Acalypha rhomboidea.M. B. Gargiullo (ca. 2008).

Acalypha rhomboidea.M. B. Gargiullo (ca. 2008).

Acalypha rhomboidea is an annual herb, to 60 cm tall, from a taproot, stems erect, simple or branched, smooth or finely hairy; bright green to reddish, often appearing translucent or succulent, sap watery; senescent plants often turning reddish. 

Leaves alternate, stalks 1-8 cm long, blades 3-9 cm long, 2-5 cm wide, only slightly longer than stalks, narrowly egg-shaped to rhombic, tip blunt, base tapered to rounded, surface finely hairy, major veins 3, palmate at base, margin bluntly toothed (crenate), new leaves often reddish. 

Flowers greenish, to yellow-green; monoecious, in axillary spikes

Acalypha rhomboidea. By Keir Morse. Copyright © 2016 Keir Morse.www.keiriosity.com.New England Wild Flower Society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org

Acalypha rhomboidea (bract). By Keir Morse. Copyright © 2016 Keir Morse.www.keiriosity.com.New England Wild Flower Society.gobotany.newenglandwild.org (Accessed 8/2016).

above (subtended by) bracts to 1.3 cm long, 1.5 cm wide, glandular-hairy (stipitate glandular), margins 5-9-lobed, lobes (teeth) 0.5 cm long, tips pointed; male flowers in a head-like cluster at tip of spike,  stamens numerous; female flowers 1-5, at base of floral spike, no petals, sepals minute, styles 3, ragged (laciniate), ovary 3-lobed; wind pollinated (Cid-Benevento 1987); blooms and fruits July-Oct.

Fruit dry, a 3-parted capsule about 0.2 cm wide (Radford et al. 1968;Yatskievych 2006); seeds 3, with fleshy attachment (aril), usually an indication of ant dispersed (Handel 1978; Handel et al. 1981).

Wetland status: FACU-.

Acalypha rhomboidea.flowers. By Donald Cameron. Copyright © 2015 Donald Cameron (Accessed 3/2015).

Acalypha rhomboidea.flowers. By Donald Cameron. Copyright © 2015 Donald Cameron (Accessed 3/2015).

Frequency in NYC: Occasional.

Origin: Native.

Habitat: Disturbed forest understories, edges, shady lawns, gardens, roadsides (appears similar to Pilea pumila, which has opposite leaves).